Sermons

Sunday Sermon 18th Sep 2016 By Fr. Simon Ng’ang’a

September 18th, 2016 | By Basilica PriestsFr. Simon Ng’ang’a

1st Reading – Amos 8:4-7 fr-simon-nganga-2
Psalms – 113 
2nd Reading – 1 Tim 2:
1-8
 
Gospel – 16: 1-13 

God versus mammon 

No servant can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon. 

Hedonic treadmill or hedonic adaptation  

– it is the observed tendency of humans to quickly return to a relatively stable level of happiness despite major positive or negative events or life changes. 
According to this theory, as a person makes more money, expectations and desires rise in tandem, which results in no permanent gain in happiness.  This term was coined by Brickman and Campbell in their essay “hedonic relativism and planning the good society” 1971. 
During the late 1990s, the concept was modified by Michael Eysenck, a British psychologist, to become the current “hedonic treadmill theory” which compares the pursuit of happiness to a person on a treadmill, who has to keep walking just to stay in the same place. 
Cf. St Augustine – “desire has no rest”, is infinite in itself, endless, and as one calls it, a perpetual rack, … Read More


Jubilee Year of Mercy

February 8th, 2016 | By Basilica PriestsFr. Simon Ng’ang’a

The jubilee year of Mercy is a special time called by the Catholic Church to receive blessings and pardon from God and remission of sins. May our passing through the Holy Door of Mercy commit us to making our own the mercy of the Good Samaritan focusing on the boundless nature of God’s mercy.

The year of mercy will help us to heal our souls and our life from temporal punishment which hinder our sanctification. In the course of the year of mercy we need to be to prepare and get disposed to receiving plenary indulgence that heals all the temporal punishment that result from our sins and remnants of the wounds in our souls brought about by our sinfulness.

Temporal punishment refers to the following human experiences.

  • Feeling unhappy occasionally
  • Emptiness and void
  • Boredom about life
  • Desperation or lack of hope
  • Helplessness and hopelessness
  • Lacking motivation in life/ value of life
  • Insecurity
  • Fear of the unknown
  • Discontentment/ lack of satisfaction
  • Suicidal tenderness/ suicidal idealizations
  • Sadness
  • Loneliness
  • General anxiety or fear
  • Paranoia – feeling uncomfortable with others
  • Paranoids – when people sense like other out to harm them or persecute them
  • Bitterness, anguish and grieving
  • Death anxiety or perpetual fear
Read More

Season Of Advent

November 25th, 2015 | By Basilica PriestsFr. Simon Ng’ang’a

The term advent is derived from Latin “adventus” which means “coming”.  The pagans used the word to mean the coming of their god.  The term also meant the visit of a king to a city or the coronation day of the sovereign.

Early Christians (around 600 AD) purified this understanding and advent became a period of intense preparation for Christmas.  It therefore originated in the early church as a short period of intense preparation for celebration of the nativity/ birth of our lord Jesus Christ. It slowly came to be structured into the four weeks of advent we have today.

 Advent has twofold character and therefore divided into two.

  1. From 1st Sunday to 16th In this period the focus of the liturgy, i.e. readings, prayers are on the second coming of Christ at the end of time.
  1. From 17th December to 24th December when the focus is on Christmas. This time Christians are invited to observe a Novena, intensify their prayers; prepare their hearts through repentance to receive Christ in their hearts during Christmas.

At times we concentrate on what to slaughter, dress code, sites to visit etc. at the expense of interior preparations.

The period … Read More